Consider Your Plea Or Your Life May Change Forever

Too Fast A Resolution To Your Criminal Case Could Cost You Long Term

With literally decades of legal experience under his belt, starting in the early 1970’s, attorney Glenn R. Roderman has seen his share of cases get resolved by plea bargains with prosecutors. Sometimes, taking a plea can be the best answer to resolving a case quickly and efficiently, and this is particularly true if there are circumstances making it difficult to mount an effective defense. You can watch videos of Mr. Roderman discussing the pros and cons of trials.

Behind Bars, The Pressure Is Great To Get Out Of Jail

Broward County main jailCertainly, when one is sitting in a jail cell awaiting a court date, there is immense appeal to being released sooner rather than later. Taking a plea bargain to get out of jail, however, is a mistake. First, considering the facts of your case is a critical measure of whether you are being man-handled by the prosecution. It is no secret that prosecutors will sometimes stack charges in their information filings in order to impel the accused into making a rash decision. This type of prosecutorial coersion has been met with great success by states’ attorneys and districts’ attorneys nationwide. It is not unique to Florida.

What results, in many cases, however, is that one will cop to a plea for a crime he did not commit, only because it will result in his release from jail more quickly. If the case is resolved by plea, and the conviction is for a felony charge, a slew of new issues now comes into play. Considering these issues and their long-term impact on your life is critical to avoiding a plea bargain trap. But, how do you know when such a trap is laid?

Viewing your situatation from a long-term perspective will help put your current circumstances in their proper place. You can only do this when you have competent legal representation, and that does not mean taking the advice of fellow inmates or friends and relatives.

Know Your Real Options By Discussing Your Case With An Attorney

Glenn R. Roderman discussing a case with a client.

Glenn R. Roderman discussing a case with a client.

First, you should consult with a qualified legal advocate or representative. This means you need to lawyer up, period! A qualified criminal attorney, like Glenn R. Roderman, will be able to assess the state’s case against you, explain your options and help you determine the proper course to resolve your criminal case. Viewing your situatation from a long-term perspective will help put your current circumstances in their proper place. You can only do this when you have competent legal representation, and that does not mean taking the advice of fellow inmates or friends and relatives.

What Changes With A Bad Plea?

Taking a plea bargain, especially when there are other options available, will impact your life in myriad ways. In many states, copping a plea or otherwise being convicted of a felony will result in a permanent loss of your civil rights. This is hardly a bargain, long term, particularly when you may have a far better option. One of those civil rights is the right to vote, one of our most precious gifts in the United States. Florida, among a host of other states, permanently revokes your right to vote when you are convicted of a felony. In fact, only two states permit felons to vote, even while behind bars, as you can read in a chart on ProCon.org.

Something else that happens is that you become registered as a convicted felon, a moniker that will forever follow you, regardless of the state in which you find yourself. This has a tremendous impact on the kind of jobs you can take, whether you will qualify for certain government-backed loans, whether you can ever be bonded or licensed, among a plethora of other negative consequences.

The damage of a felony conviction simply can not be understated. Given that we are fortunate to live in the United States, opportunity to restart one’s life always abound. However, needlessly adding new legal barriers to your happiness and success can often be avoided, particularly if you heed the sound advice of a good attorney.